Coastal protection




Status:

Advice provided

Advice date:

2003 to 2018

Summary

The State Environmental Planning Policy No 71 - Coastal Protection (SEPP 71) required the Minister for Planning to consult with the Commission before approving a draft master plan for subdivision of land within the coastal zone or waiving the need for a master plan. Since SEPP 71 was repealed in 2018, the Commission no longer has that statutory role.

SEPP 71 advice

Between 2003 and 2018, the Commission reviewed 326 SEPP 71 related requests (see table) and provided advice to the Minister for Planning. The Commission's advice considered the development proposal's risks to achieving the SEPP 71 aims and objectives, and recommended whether or not the Commission supported the draft master plan or the request to waive the need for a master plan.

Year Review of request to waive the need for a master plan Review of draft master plan Total
2017-2018 5 0 5
2016-2017 11 0 11
2015-2016 3 1 4
2014-2015 6 0 6
2013-2014 6 0 6
2012-2013 9 0 9
2011-2012 7 0 7
2010-2011 8 0 8
2009-2010 7 0 7
2008-2009 12 0 12
2007-2008 13 0 13
2006-2007 52 4 56
2005-2006 81 8 89
2004-2005 58 11 69
2003-2004 21 3 24
Total 299 27 326

Submission to the planning system review

In November 2011, the Commission provided a submission to the NSW planning system review. The submission provided insight on the operation of SEPP 71 and covered other issues relevant to the overall alignment between natural resource management and statutory land use planning.

Progress report on master planning under SEPP 71

In April 2007, the Commission provided a progress report on master planning under SEPP 71. The report highlighted the areas where the aims of SEPP 71 were not being met effectively, including:

  • development assessments under the SEPP are not required to consider the development’s impact on NSW’s ability to meet the state-wide targets for natural resources as reflected regionally through the relevant catchment action plan
  • the master planning process of SEPP 71 is only triggered for subdivisions. Developers can and do effectively circumvent the master planning requirements by applying to subdivide the land after the consent authority has granted consent for development. Once development consent has been granted, there is limited scope to improve consideration of natural resource outcomes from a development through the master planning provisions.

Key documents